Now is the time to empower local government | Matthew Cowley

2016 has seen a paradigm shift in our political system. The Brexit vote will lead to significant areas of legislative control being returned to the Westminster Parliament, while the proposed boundary changes will see the number of MPs in the Commons reduced by 50, to 600. With these two events in particular in mind, is […]

Universities need a mental health revolution | Danny Bowman

Think back to that midsummer’s day in July, when, on the steps of 10 Downing Street, Theresa May gave her inaugural address to the British people as their new Prime Minister. Promising to make the country one that “works for everyone”, her speech contained one sentence that signified that perhaps, at long last, the issue […]

The NUS’s censorship has rendered it unfit for purpose | Luke Nash-Jones

Last week, many young anti-NUS activists across the UK were both thrilled and surprised to hear that Prime Minister Theresa May, and also Tory MP Victoria Atkins, have heard our voice, as they hit out during Prime Minister’s Questions at the “safe space” policy found on many university campuses. Fascinating words, and potentially a crucial […]

Grammar schools: selective aspiration beats comprehensive failure | Joseph Prebble

I am not a huge fan of Theresa May. Her time as Home Secretary was plagued by a hopeless failure to meet immigration targets and the growth of a quasi-surveillance state. So it is with pleasant surprise that I greet her and education secretary Justine Greening’s brave foray into the potential of grammar schools. I […]

The rise of the neo-con student | Alasdair Johnston

Jeremy Corbyn’s train debacle transformed two suppositions of mine into convictions. The first is that Jeremy Corbyn is utterly useless. The second, perhaps more salient, is that the student Conservative body is increasingly becoming the student neo-conservative body. Keyboard activists immediately set about the task of condemning Jezz for becoming a caricature of something he […]

Russia’s election: flawed, but a sign of progress | Phil Sheppard

This Sunday, millions of Russians will be heading to the polls to vote in elections for Russia’s parliament, the State Duma; the eighth since the first free election in 1990. Many observers and ordinary Russians believe that this election is the least fascinating, as there is much less media coverage of it than one might […]

A Trump presidency will see Scottish politicians eating their words | Robert Blackley

Could Scotland Benefit From President Trump? If any issue has defined Scottish public life in recent times it is the question of Scotland’s place in the world. Twice in the space of three years Scots have been asked where our beautiful green plot ought to sit, both in terms of the United Kingdom and our […]

Brexit means letting Theresa May get on with it | Matthew Cowley

The impact of uncertainty on an economy has never been more apparent than in the case of the Brexit vote. Nothing has changed since the vote – the UK remains in the European Union, Article 50 has not been activated, and no deal for departure has been agreed – and yet the markets have already […]

ISIS will not leave us alone: we must fight them | David Browne

“If we don’t provoke them, they’ll leave us alone”. At its heart, this appears to be a core belief of the “non-interventionist” lobby, but it’s rarely expressed so plainly. Rather, we’re told that “Western foreign policy” is responsible for just about every ill in the Middle East at present – cue Chomsky’s famous line that […]

Censorship in music – where it came from, and where it’s going | Lauren Wade

As with any art form, the connection between music and politics has always been present. Also always present has been the pressure from some to censor this music, to tone down its more extreme outbursts. Historically, there are myriad examples of pieces of music influencing political movements, but equally as many of songs becoming the […]