Conscience of a Conservative: How Barry Goldwater’s Ideas Could Save Us | Sarah Stook

In 1960, US Senator for Arizona, Barry Goldwater released ‘Conscience of a Conservative,’ a book in which he laid out his views on conservatism, the Republican Party and the politics of the United States of America. Four years later, Goldwater would be decimated in an election against incumbent Lyndon B. Johnson, who was riding on […]

The Broadest Churches Will Always Collapse | Jake Scott

I’ve seen a lot of comments about the Conservative Party’s manifesto in the General Election this year; from the Left, it has been branded “more right wing than David Cameron ever dared to be”. From the Right, it has been decried as “blue Labour” or “red Tory”, and an abandonment of conservative principles – one Independent […]

A Conservative Case for Trigger Warnings | Nicholas Linfoot

Trigger warnings, an intellectual flashpoint, a source of clashes, debates and countless furious Twitter spats. Almost universally associated with the more liberal wing of the political world, there is, however, an argument that trigger warnings – far from being the next step in some liberal conspiracy by the “remoaners” to “kill Pepe” – are in […]

May ’til Christmas?│Sebastian Cousins

Grassroots anger is growing. Demands for Christmas to be an exodus and genesis increase in volume. The end of May is nearing. To be honest, that was a tad melodramatic. And, though almost everyone on the political spectrum wants her to go for various reasons,  May is not going to jump, nor does the party’s […]

A Brief History of Conservatism (V): Society

As is usually the case, this article begins with ruminations on Baroness Thatcher’s contribution to the legacy of conservatism. Margaret Thatcher once (in)famously declared that there is “no such thing as society”. It earned her the enmity of the Left permanently, whose very philosophy is built around the primacy of society and the subjection of […]

Boris Johnson is living in the past | Harry Howard

Boris Johnson’s widely anticipated opening speech at this year’s Conservative Party Conference, his first as Foreign Secretary, was typical Boris-style; bombastic, laced with humour, and of course, a few concoctions thrown in. Given the environment in which he was making the speech: post-Brexit vote, post Iraq, post Blair, you would have thought that, since the […]

Censorship in music – where it came from, and where it’s going | Lauren Wade

As with any art form, the connection between music and politics has always been present. Also always present has been the pressure from some to censor this music, to tone down its more extreme outbursts. Historically, there are myriad examples of pieces of music influencing political movements, but equally as many of songs becoming the […]

Grammar schools: A vital lifeline for social mobility | Harry Mason

Aside From “Brexit means Brexit”, Theresa May’s boldest commitment so far has been the grammar school revolution – the proposal to repeal Labour’s 1998 ban on the opening of new grammar schools, in order to give England’s brightest youngsters an encouraging platform from which to leap, regardless of class or social status. It’s wonderful to […]