Today Marks the Dawn of a New Britain | Matthew Cowley

Today, after many (literal) trials and tribulations, the Prime Minister fired the starting gun on Brexit. In the next two years, we will get more of a glimpse into what Brexit will look like, but here is a quick take on what Brexit should actually mean for Britain. The first (chronologically) and easiest thing for […]

The Scotland Question: Theresa May’s Four Options | Matthew Cowley

The announcement that Nicola Sturgeon thinks a generation lasts five years was an unsurprising one, and it leaves the UK in an interesting position. With it seeming inevitable that the SNP minority government will be able to force their referendum demand through Holyrood, here’s a look at the four options that faced Theresa May yesterday […]

No, Theresa May should not condemn Donald Trump

Twitter last night consisted almost entirely of tweets on two subjects: President Trump’s erroneously labelled ‘Muslim ban’, and Theresa May’s refusal to publicly condemn the President’s latest executive order. “Theresa the Appeaser”, she was called. What rubbish. To label her this insinuates a weakness of character that is simply not part of our Prime Minister’s […]

Heathrow’s third runway clears our economy for takeoff | Chris Murray

Plans for a third runway at Heathrow have been floating around Westminster ever since Gordon Brown’s fumbling premiership, as successive governments timorously skirted an issue which has been the centre of much controversy. That accusation is certainly not one that can be aimed toward Theresa May, however. This week, the Government officially announced its support […]

Theresa May is not unelected | Matthew Cowley

There are many conflicts inherent within modern politics: the fact that we bemoan the lack of young people in politics and yet berate young politicians as both inexperienced and careerist; our desire for more ‘normal’ people in politics but our aversion to paying a wage that would enable less affluent people to afford to enter […]

The NUS’s censorship has rendered it unfit for purpose | Luke Nash-Jones

Last week, many young anti-NUS activists across the UK were both thrilled and surprised to hear that Prime Minister Theresa May, and also Tory MP Victoria Atkins, have heard our voice, as they hit out during Prime Minister’s Questions at the “safe space” policy found on many university campuses. Fascinating words, and potentially a crucial […]

Grammar schools: selective aspiration beats comprehensive failure | Joseph Prebble

I am not a huge fan of Theresa May. Her time as Home Secretary was plagued by a hopeless failure to meet immigration targets and the growth of a quasi-surveillance state. So it is with pleasant surprise that I greet her and education secretary Justine Greening’s brave foray into the potential of grammar schools. I […]

Brexit means letting Theresa May get on with it | Matthew Cowley

The impact of uncertainty on an economy has never been more apparent than in the case of the Brexit vote. Nothing has changed since the vote – the UK remains in the European Union, Article 50 has not been activated, and no deal for departure has been agreed – and yet the markets have already […]

Grammar schools: A vital lifeline for social mobility | Harry Mason

Aside From “Brexit means Brexit”, Theresa May’s boldest commitment so far has been the grammar school revolution – the proposal to repeal Labour’s 1998 ban on the opening of new grammar schools, in order to give England’s brightest youngsters an encouraging platform from which to leap, regardless of class or social status. It’s wonderful to […]