My Top Ten: US First Ladies | Sarah Stook

Since George Washington ascended the office of President in 1789, the office of First Lady has also existed, with Martha Washington being the first to take up the mantle. For over two hundred years, these women have been constant residents of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Though they are usually wives, daughters, sisters and friends of bachelors […]

The Broadest Churches Will Always Collapse | Jake Scott

I’ve seen a lot of comments about the Conservative Party’s manifesto in the General Election this year; from the Left, it has been branded “more right wing than David Cameron ever dared to be”. From the Right, it has been decried as “blue Labour” or “red Tory”, and an abandonment of conservative principles – one Independent […]

The Answer to the Trump Right and the Corbyn Left | Matthew Cowley

The Trump Right and the Corbyn Left are significantly different on paper, but both are symptoms of the same kind of political problems. Trump rails against free trade and immigration; Corbyn against big multinationals, foreign property investors, and the free movement of capital that enables tax evasion. Their target market is the kind of people […]

Why leaving the EU allows us to reduce VAT │ Jake Scott

There have been fewer heated topics in the last year than that of luxury item Value Added Tax (VAT) and the product this targets most obviously – the tampon. Crudely dubbed, the “tampon tax” has incensed the internet’s most ardent keyboard activists who shout that a tax on a bodily function is despicable. I’m inclined […]

A Conservative Case for Trigger Warnings | Nicholas Linfoot

Trigger warnings, an intellectual flashpoint, a source of clashes, debates and countless furious Twitter spats. Almost universally associated with the more liberal wing of the political world, there is, however, an argument that trigger warnings – far from being the next step in some liberal conspiracy by the “remoaners” to “kill Pepe” – are in […]

The Legacy of Sexual Assault in Warzones | Sarah Stook

Part 1 in A World in Crisis. Warning that this article contains brief descriptions of the aftermath of violent rape. In December 2013, war erupted in the world’s newest nation, South Sudan. A country only aged two at the start of the conflict, government instability led to the crisis that is still raging today. Ethnic […]

A Brief History of Conservatism (VII): Freedom

Before this article begins proper, to assuage any impression of inconsistency between this article and the previous article on rights, I would like to reiterate that the concept of rights, for the conservative, is the traditionally liberal conception of being a language of politics, and hence of governance. ‘Rights’ are something you claim against the […]

May ’til Christmas?│Sebastian Cousins

Grassroots anger is growing. Demands for Christmas to be an exodus and genesis increase in volume. The end of May is nearing. To be honest, that was a tad melodramatic. And, though almost everyone on the political spectrum wants her to go for various reasons,  May is not going to jump, nor does the party’s […]

Representation Over Representativeness: The Case for First-Past-the-Post | Matthew Cowley

Aside from the arguments around its traditional place in our political structure, there are several arguments in favour of First-Past-the-Post (FPTP). Whilst the clamour for electoral reform has continued to grow, the case for it isn’t as black-and-white as it is being made to seem, and it is about time that those of us opposed […]

A Brief History of Conservatism (VI): Rights

Conservatives have traditionally framed the protection of rights alongside the requirements of responsibility and duty; after all, it makes logical sense that your right is my responsibility. Where the liberal and socialist experiments have transgressed this natural logic is over the boundary between what Isaiah Berlin termed ‘negative’ and ‘positive’ liberty. Also, it must be […]